Health Concerns Rise Along With Hawaii Eruptions

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — There’s more trouble in paradise: The eruption of Hawaii’s Kilauea volcano may lead to respiratory and other health problems for residents of the Big Island, an expert warns. Besides facing the possibility of more devastating lava flows, Hawaiians must contend with high levels of toxic volcanic ash and…

How Exercise Helps Your Heart

TUESDAY, May 22, 2018 (HealthDay News) — You already know that exercise is good for your health and your heart, both to prevent heart disease and, for those who already have a heart-related condition, to make managing it easier. But you might be even more motivated to work out if you better understand exactly how…

Vendors Say Pot Eases Morning Sickness. Will Baby Pay a Price?

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — Nearly 70 percent of Colorado marijuana dispensaries recommended pot products to manage early pregnancy-related morning sickness, new research reveals. In a “mystery caller” approach, researchers posed as women who were eight weeks pregnant, experiencing nausea and vomiting, and seeking advice about cannabis product use. Four hundred marijuana dispensaries…

AHA: Making America's Doctors Look More Like America

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (American Heart Association) — When Dr. Luis Castellanos was a resident at UC San Diego School of Medicine, he noticed there weren’t many Spanish-speaking physicians on staff, even though Latinos comprise about a third of the city’s population. Occasionally, the Mexican-American cardiologist found himself translating for his colleagues — a task…

Even a Mosquito's Spit May Help Make You Sick

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — When a pesky mosquito bites you, even its saliva triggers an immune response, new animal research suggests. The study, conducted in mice, suggests the illnesses that come from mosquito bites — diseases such as malaria, dengue fever or Zika, for example — might be exacerbated by mosquito saliva.…

Banned Pregnancy Drug Linked to ADHD Generations Later

MONDAY, May 21, 2018 (HealthDay News) — A pregnancy drug that has been banned for decades may increase the risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) generations later, new research suggests. The study found that the grandchildren of women who took a synthetic estrogen, diethylstilbestrol (also known as DES), to prevent pregnancy complications between 1938 and 1971…